Liberation Programs: A Look Back at 2017 and Hope for The New Year

end-overdose-deaths-2018

 

Just two weeks ago, we welcomed in the new year. This is the perfect time to hope for the future and to reflect on the year that has past. In Fiscal Year 2017, we helped more individuals than ever before, making it our best year ever in that sense. We provided medication assisted treatment (MAT), mental health counseling, and other vital services to 2,215 individuals. I am happy to share that, of those receiving MAT, 75 percent eliminated or significantly reduced the use of illicit opioids, improving their life function. None of these individuals were among the estimated 1,076 Connecticut lives lost to drug overdose in 2017.

While 2017 may have been our best year—with so much left to do—it was also one of our most challenging years. Sadly, we closed 2017 with news that life expectancy in the United States had fallen for the second year in a row, in large part, due to the opioid epidemic and alcohol dependence. And the numbers show that opioid overdose deaths affect all people regardless of their race, gender, economic status, or any other characteristic. With more than 2.13 million Americans suffering from opioid dependence but only 20 percent receiving treatment, we have a long way to go.

Communities across the nation have the ability to end this epidemic of overdose deaths. For instance, Liberation Programs is launching the Bridgeport Integrated Health and Wellness Center. By augmenting our existing mental health and addiction treatments with a comprehensive array of services including family therapy, services for children, parent education, and vocational programs, we will provide an encouraging and welcoming environment to allow more individuals and families to get the help they need. We have taken on the construction of this center without state or federal support because the Bridgeport Community needs these services—and because it is the right thing to do. Other communities feel the same way and are following a similar model to help more people get access to care. There may still be a lot to do in 2018, but local communities like ours have the capability to end this crisis.

Liberation Programs could not have made so much progress in 2017 without the hard work of our employees—and I offer my sincerest thanks to these wonderful, dedicated women and men. I am also deeply grateful every day for the steadfast support of our board of directors. They help make everything that Liberation does possible. Last but not least, I owe a special debt of gratitude to our other donors and volunteers, those loyal friends whose sacrifices help make the work we do a reality. Thank you for believing in our mission long before the opioid crisis was a trending topic in the news. I hope that all of those who helped us make 2017 a successful year will join us in taking more steps this year towards ending overdose deaths in lower Fairfield County.

As a next step on our journey together, would you please follow us on social media? Like, comment, and share our posts so we can spread information about how we, as a community, can end this epidemic.

 

By Alan Mathis

President and CEO of Liberation Programs

Sources:

Medical Examiner

National Survey on Drug Use and Health