Chief Recovery Officer, Maggie Young, Speaks on Trauma and Recovery

Watch Liberation’s Chief Recovery Officer, Maggie Young, speak to the Connecticut Women’s Consortium on her journey through trauma and recovery.

Liberation Programs Announces Board of Directors for Fiscal Year 2021

Liberation Programs, Inc Announces Appointment of New Board Chair and Directors

(Norwalk, CT) – Liberation Programs, Inc (LPI) announced the start of its new Fiscal Year on July 1, 2020 with the appointment of a new Chair of the Board of Directors, two new Board Members.

Joining the Board are Debra Hertz, Maria B. Hancock, and Kirk S. Santos. Hertz will be reprising her former role as Board Chair for a one-year term. These appointments bring the total number of Board members to 14.

“We are excited to welcome Debra back to our Board in this leadership capacity and to have Maria and Kirk join this group. Their combined experiences and connections will be instrumental for an important year ahead as we continue adapting to the Coronavirus Pandemic, advocating for social justice, and celebrating our 50th Anniversary in 2021 all while providing unparalleled service for those who need us”, said President and CEO, John Hamilton. “We are all grateful to our departing Board Chair, Wayne Cafran, for his years of service as well as Roberta Cohen, Mort Lowenthal and Patricia Muldowney who served on our Board for over a decade collectively”.

Debra Hertz is returning to Chair the LPI Board having departed the Board in 2015. Hertz is a management consultant and founder of The Strategy Group, LLC with over 25 years advising nonprofit and philanthropic sectors. She holds a PhD. and Master of Social Work from Fordham University where she also teaches leadership courses in the Graduate School of Social Service. A Darien resident, Hertz is on the Board of Directors of Achievement First – Bridgeport.

 

Maria B. Hancock, Rye, NY, is an international executive and entrepreneur with extensive experience in investing and mentoring start-ups and advising on climate risk. Hancock has a PhD. in Theoretical Nuclear Physics from Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität which she utilizes in product innovation, operational leadership, and risk assessment.

 

 

Kirk S. Santos, Mount Kisco, NY, is Chief Learning Officer at Pitney Bowes in Stamford. Previously, Santos held various positions at many Fortune 500 companies including PepsiCo, IBM, and Caesars Entertainment. Santos has extensive experience in Human Resource Strategy including retention, compensation, diversity, talent management, and succession planning. He holds a Master Strategic Management/Human Resources from Long Island University and is a member of the National Society of Hispanic MBAs, Society of Human Resource Management and Sigma Beta Delta.

 

The current Board of Directors for Liberation Programs:

Debra Hertz, Chair

John Bassler, Vice-Chair

Dennis Monson, Treasurer

Laura Beck, Secretary

Dr. Frank Appah, Jr

Steve Fogarty

Maria Hancock

Allison Milne

David M. Morosan

Kwame Moses

Sallyan Pelletier

Kirk Santos

Cynthia Shaw

Brigitte Van Den Houte

Liberation Programs Responds to Racial Injustice

Dear Friends,

At Liberation Programs, we stand against racism, social injustice, and police brutality. In recent days we have watched in horror as George Floyd was murdered by a police officer. Racial tensions and violence against Black individuals have once again shaken our society. We stand with you in your grief, anger, and sadness at the inequality and violence that have taken place far too often for Black Americans. We understand that there is now more stress, anxiety, and fear during a time when we were already experiencing heightened emotions and trauma.

We believe that hope is the cornerstone of all human healing; one cannot instill both hope and fear. We stand for hope. The work we do depends on our ability to earn trust which cannot take root without respect. We disavow acts that create humiliation. We condemn racism and we are committed to being change agents by listening, learning, sharing, and supporting you during these difficult times.

We know the criminal justice system is flawed and we are committed to its reform through diversion and deflection. Recovery, prevention, and intervention are possible for all. Our doors are open to all who need our services and we promise to treat everyone respectfully.

As an agency, we are committed to systemic change and will continue developing a workforce and Board of Directors who reflect those we serve. We stand in solidarity with the Black community and remain committed to change for an equitable society.

Blacks Lives Matter; you matter to me.

 

Yours,

 

 

John Hamilton

President & CEO

Liberation Programs Remains Open During Coronavirus Pandemic

Liberation Programs, a leading behavioral health organization specializing in substance use treatment in Fairfield County, is adapting to the Coronavirus Pandemic to continue its life saving programs at a time when they are needed more than ever. Liberation’s Outpatient Programs in Bridgeport and Stamford are still accepting walk in admissions for mental health, Methadone, extended release naltrexone, and Buprenorphine as approved by the CT Department of Mental Health Services (DMHAS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Telehealth counseling services are being used in addition to enhanced protections for in person medicating. Inpatient programs are continuing undisrupted with enhanced social distancing measures in place. We have also partnered with a Federally Qualified Health Center to provide telehealth primary care medical services to Recoverees to ensure their safety while allowing for continued medical care. Additionally, Liberation’s Mobile Wellness Van is in Washington Park in Bridgeport from 10am – 2pm on Wednesdays providing Buprenorphine, harm reduction syringe exchange and overdose kits.

In the month of March, Liberation Programs saw an increase in outpatient admissions with one location having an 18% increase in new admissions. As the Coronavirus Pandemic continues, and in its aftermath, Liberation expects to see an increase in admissions and need for their services. The anxiety, fear, stress and sense of loss due to Coronavirus is a recipe for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder which has a high comorbidity with Substance Use Disorders. Stress and trauma are strong risk factors for addiction as well as relapse, treatment failure and a lack of willingness to quit. while dealing with trauma can lead to relapse and lack of willingness to quit. Loss of a consistent routine and the unprecedented increase in unemployment are both indicators of a dramatic increase in drug use. Last month, the “Disaster Distress Hotline” at SAMHSA saw an 891% increase in calls over March of 2019 and a 338% increase in calls compared to the month before.

A vital part of Substance Use Treatment is social support which can be difficult with necessary social distancing protocols. It is essential to rely on technology wherever possible to deal with trauma and anxiety while connecting with others. This is also true for first responders, medical staff and frontline workers who are at risk of developing PTSD from this pandemic. Isolation and social distancing can lead to feelings of loneliness and lack of emotional connections which can lead to increased use and self-medication with drugs and alcohol.

After the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, substance use increased in Manhattan by 27% and remained high even when reports of depression and PTSD had declined. After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, there was a 35% increase in hospitalizations for Substance Use Disorder in Louisiana. Both traumatic events had largely regional effects while the Coronavirus Pandemic has national and global ramifications.

Individuals with Substance Use Disorders are not only at risk of having lasting mental health effects due to the Coronavirus, many are more susceptible to complications from contracting Coronavirus. Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder, methamphetamine use and those who smoke or vape are especially at risk of complications. The timing of the Coronavirus Pandemic is especially unfortunate as we are currently experiencing a national and local Opioid Epidemic. It is critical that Substance Use Treatment is available to curb preventable hospitalizations that will pull resources from Coronavirus frontlines. There are also many instances where change in routine and more time spent at home can lead to finding a sense of purpose and desire to seek treatment.

There are many resources available from Liberation Programs as well as SAMHSA and CT DMHAS for those struggling with stressors related to the Coronavirus Pandemic as well as those living with Substance Use Disorders. Liberation Programs remains open to serve the community in lower Fairfield County during this pandemic and after. To get more information, please visit www.liberationprograms.org, call 855.LIB.PROG (855.542.7764) or email info@liberationprograms.org.